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DESIGN   4'?m2f Evolution debate: Design implies a designer

AMY -- (enters, barefoot, carrying sea shell) Did you find 
anything?

LIZ -- (enters opposite, barefoot empty-handed) Not a thing. How 
about you?

AMY -- Just one little snail shell. (holds up shell) It looks 
like we chose the wrong stretch of beach.

LIZ -- Well, one shell is better than I did. Let's see. (holds 
out hand)

AMY -- (gives shell) Maybe we should try farther down the coast.

LIZ -- (examines shell) Oooo! This one is pretty! Isn't it 
amazing how they've evolved?!

AMY -- Evolved?! You don't believe that evolution garbage, do 
you?

LIZ -- Sure. Lots of Christians believe that God created life on 
earth through evolution. I mean, it only makes sense. 

AMY -- Not to me it doesn't.

LIZ -- So, you're one of those FUNDAMENTALISTS who believes that 
the universe was made in seven literal days?

AMY -- Well, actually, according to the theory of relativity 
seven literal days could be anywhere from seven 24-hour days to 
several billion years, depending on where you place the clock.

LIZ -- So, billions of years is plenty of time for evolution to 
take place.

AMY -- Only if you ignore the laws of physics and chemistry.

LIZ -- Awe, come on!

AMY -- Forget the laws of physics and chemistry for a minute. 
Evolution even defies logic.

LIZ -- It seems logical to me.

AMY -- Alright, suppose you were walking along this beach here 
and you happened to see a wrist watch lying in the sand. What 
would you think?

LIZ -- What would I think?

AMY -- Yeah, would you just assume that it assembled itself by 
random acts of nature? 

LIZ -- No. I would assume that someone dropped it there.

AMY -- Why?

LIZ -- Why?

AMY -- Yeah, what is there about a watch that would lead you to 
believe that it could not assemble itself by random acts of 
nature?

LIZ -- I don't know, I guess it's because of the moving parts 
and the numbers.

AMY -- Exactly. You've concluded that because something has 
complexity and design, it can't be a random occurrance in 
nature. Someone must have designed it.

LIZ -- Well, sure.

AMY -- Yet, evolutionists are saying that things like that 
(point to shell), which are actually complex machines, can 
somehow assembled themselves by random accidents of nature.

LIZ -- A sea shell isn't all that complex.

AMY -- No, but the animal that used to live in that shell is a 
very complex machine. It not only has moving parts, but it can 
actually move itself around on its own. Do you see many watches 
crawling around on their own?

LIZ -- Well, no, of course not.

AMY -- A snail also has complex sensory organs. It can see 
light. It can feel if it bumped into an obstacle. It can even 
supply it's own energy, which is equivalent to a watch winding 
itself and never needing new batteries.

LIZ -- It really is like a complex machine, isn't it?

AMY -- That's not all. Have you ever seen a wrist watch  
assemble itself from a blueprint of DNA with BILLIONS of 
mathematical instruction codes, codes that are designed to 
overlap each other to save space and to automatically correct 
assembly errors.

LIZ -- I guess if it can grow from an egg to an adult, a snail 
CAN assemble itself, can't it?

AMY -- And if there's a mathematical code, someone had to encode 
it.

LIZ -- (holds own wrist watch at eye level) I'm just trying to 
imagine myself a with set of blueprints for building a complete 
wrist watch. And, you know, I'm a fairly smart person and I 
don't have the foggiest idea how to start building even the 
simplest parts. 

AMY -- Then try to image how smart you would have to be to 
assemble a wrist watch that can build exact replicas of itself 
from scratch.

LIZ -- Oh, you're talking about having babies. I guess they 
really are exact replicas of their parents, aren't they? That is 
quite a complex design, isn't it? (holds shell up to eye level)

AMY -- Do you still believe it just happened by random 
occurrances in nature?

LIZ -- No way. It would be easier to believe that a watch 
assembled itself by accident.

AMY -- (points past Liz to exit, cross past Liz) Oh, look! A 
Rollex is crawling up on shore! (laughs, exits)

LIZ -- Where? (follows) Oh, very funny.

2013 Bob Snook. Conditions for use:
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